Airtight Buildings

A ‘supertight’ building envelope that restricts the leakage of air can offer as much as a 15% reduction in carbon emissions alongside a similar, unsealed building.

So how is air leakage measured?

Prior to commissioning, buildings are sealed and air pressure built up inside to measure the rate at which air escapes from the structure.

Air leakage or ‘air permeability’ guidelines are set out in Part L of the Building Regulations, which stipulate an air leakage rate of 10m3/m2/hr at 50 Pascal.

Through superior design and careful detailing, our buildings will dramatically reduce leakage, exceeding the statutory requirements by nearly 90%. Our aim is to achieve a leakage approaching only 1m3/m2/hr.

Minimising air permeability is one of the most effective ways in which we can reduce the energy needed to heat the building.

Airtight Buildings

A ‘supertight’ building envelope that restricts the leakage of air can offer as much as a 15% reduction in carbon emissions alongside a similar, unsealed building.

So how is air leakage measured?

Prior to commissioning, buildings are sealed and air pressure built up inside to measure the rate at which air escapes from the structure.

Air leakage or ‘air permeability’ guidelines are set out in Part L of the Building Regulations, which stipulate an air leakage rate of 10m3/m2/hr at 50 Pascal.

Through superior design and careful detailing, our buildings will dramatically reduce leakage, exceeding the statutory requirements by nearly 90%. Our aim is to achieve a leakage approaching only 1m3/m2/hr.

Minimising air permeability is one of the most effective ways in which we can reduce the energy needed to heat the building.

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